sjhstrangetales

DEATH OF A CONSPIRACY THEORIST

Posted on: October 22, 2016

The untimely death of Max Spiers, a 39-year-old father-of-two, in a Warsaw apartment last June, has recently been hitting the British media, amid claims from his loved ones that he died at the hands of dark forces.  It is certainly a fascinating case.

I think it’s fair to say that Max, from Canterbury in Kent, was a pretty hard-core conspiracy theorist.  Anyone who has studied conspiracy theories will know that they cover a very broad range, from the more plausible – the assassination of JFK, the death of Dr David Kelly, to name but two – to the utterly fantastical, such as Her Majesty the Queen being a shape-shifting lizard, and Nazi’s operating from an Antarctic base.

Max was a passionate advocate of conspiracy theories, and according to his mother, Vanessa Bates, was making a name for himself in that field.  Last Summer (2016) he was invited to speak at a UFO conference in Poland.  Max believed in many things.   He believed in the New World Order (that the world is being run by Satanic beings who feed off negative energy), the Fourth Reich, and that he had been a victim of MKUltra, the CIA’s  highly controversial mind control programme.  Although MKUltra was officially closed in 1973, Max claimed he was one of a generation of children born in the 1970s who was a victim of it.  He said he was a child of Project IBIS, begun in 1972 and run until 1980, which was instigated to create a race of super-children.  He said he had “woken up” at the age of 31.

He also believed in Dulce Base, an alleged underground facility in New Mexico, run jointly by humans and aliens, to clone hybrids.  Like David Icke, he believed that many of the ruling elite are reptiles, and that these reptilian creatures are located under the sea between Dover and Calais.  He said that the assassination of John F Kennedy, and the death of Diana, Princess of Wales were rituals for brainwashing the masses, and that 9/11 was a false flag event.   Max also said there are massive underground cities beneath London and Los Angeles.   As I said earlier, this is all pretty hard-core conspiracy stuff.

Four days before his death, Max gave an interview on a Polish YouTube channel, in which he spoke of his investigations into paedophilia in the US military.   He also said he believed Nazi’s and Zionists were involved in a long-running war going back 50,000 years, “they just weren’t called Nazi and Zion, that’s just a modern-day nom”. He also complained of feeling tired, and his voice was slurred.

Although, by all accounts, Max was a healthy, fit young man, he  died suddenly in a Warsaw apartment, where he had been staying with a friend, Monika Duval, whom he hadn’t known for very long.  Friends say Max vomited black liquid just before he passed away.  A few days before his death he had sent his mother a message saying: “your boy’s in trouble.  If anything happens to me, investigate”.

His mother, Mrs Bates, told the MailOnline she had heard “Satanic rituals” being chanted over her son’s body as she spoke to his flatmate on the telephone.  “Put milk by this side, and get garlic and put flowers and put vinegar and very weird things going on.  I could hear it being said.  It sounded like rituals going on.  Some sort of Satanic rituals”.   She said Monika Duval had sent her  a “threatening” book on devil worship, which included a chapter on Illuminati Blood Sacrifices.   She had also been sent pictures of Max with a head wound, and two of him lying in a coffin wearing “a strange silk suit”.  Mrs Bates said “I think Max had been digging in some dark places and I fear that somebody wanted him dead”.

Mrs Bates said she had a death certificate from the Polish authorities saying that Max had died of natural causes, but no post-mortem had been done, and “they are also refusing to release any paperwork about it to me because, absurdly, I don’t have his written permission”.

Soon after Mrs Bates had gone public with her concerns, Scott C Waring of UFO Sightings Daily told Metro that he believed UFO researchers are now being targeted, “probably to slow the rate of information being leaked to the public”.   This led to prominent Ufologist and ex-Ministry of Defence worker, Nick Pope, to make a tongue-in-cheek remark on Twitter that “I promise we don’t go around killing UFO researchers”.

Max’s fiance, Sarah Adams, told the Evening Standard that they had received death threats in the weeks running up to Max’s death, but this wasn’t anything unusual in the work they were doing.  “He was going to expose Black Magic”, she said “He was going to expose some of the stuff he was working on involving political leaders and celebrities”.   In another interview she said Max “was terrified, he wanted to leave”.  Sarah Adams also claimed that They had given him something to put him in a coma, and that he was in a house “in a remote forest with an electric fence around it”.

Another UFO researcher, Miles Johnson, said in an interview on BBC Radio 4’s current affairs PM programme that Max had been working to “expose enemies within other realities”.   Unfortunately it all then got a bit confusing.  When asked if Miles believed Max was dead or alive, Miles replied “not quite either … they have control of us, alive or in our death state”.

Max has been buried in Canterbury, and North East Kent Coroner’s Office say their investigations into his death are still in the “very early stages”.  So far it is said to be ” inconclusive”.

At the end of October, Mrs Bates reported that her son’s computer had been returned to her ” wiped” of activity in his final days.

In November 2016 a British tabloid newspaper reported that David Icke had donated £1000 to Mrs Bates’ investigation. 

5 Responses to "DEATH OF A CONSPIRACY THEORIST"

Although I am not a fan of conspiracy theorists I do believe that people are sometimes “silenced” if they get close to the truth on something they are working on.
I wouldn’t like to gamble here but I have a feeling if he truly had been about to expose some sort of paedophile ring then that’s a perfectly possible reason for his death, but I see you do not mention a recorded cause of death, maybe from an autopsy or the death certificate, is this information known?

Recorded as “death by natural causes”. No postmortem from Poland. Investigations still ongoing here in Britain.

Ah right thank you, I shall keep an eye out for further info on this

Did Max ever state which events were not conspiracies?

Hard-core conspirascists are like that. They see everything in that light. Some believe everything is connected in that way.

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